Grief’s Teachable Moments No Comments

There are, as you know, many teachable moments in our lives. From the time we are born our parents and teachers look for moments in which we can be taught important lessons that will affect the rest of our lives. I suspect that as we get older and are responsible for teaching those who are younger we don’t often realize…

Anticipatory Grief: What is it? No Comments

This winter I took my annual winter vacation. I actually began to plan this vacation last summer. It seemed odd planning a winter vacation while I was still basking in the sun and heat, but in anticipation of how much I dislike winter, I made my reservation and mailed a deposit for my accommodation. I booked my flight. It was still a long time before departure day, but I began to think about the places…

One Day at a Time No Comments

It is so easy to feel overwhelmed after the loss of a loved one. Routines have changed. Responsibilities have changed. Everything seems so different, and while it is true that nothing will ever be the same again, life does continue.Working through grief teaches us great lessons and broadens our vision as we discover not only that life does not end, love does not end either…

Grieving for a Spouse Who is Not Yet a Spouse No Comments

Recently my twenty-six-year-old niece Kate lost her fiancé in a car accident just two days before their wedding. In addition to her deep grief, Kate also had to face many issues because they were not yet married.First I believe she was robbed of memories. When I lost my husband, at least I had almost forty years of memories to help sustain me. Kate and her fiancé did not even have the chance…

The Five (or Seven) Stages of Grief No Comments

Many people refer to the five stages of grief. If you have lost someone or know someone who has, you will come across many articles about moving through these stages. What you do not often see is the seven stages of grief model. This model closely follows the five stages model, with two additional platforms: pain/guilt and the upward turn. In essence, these emotions or stages…

How to Recognize Complicated Grief (Prolonged Grief Disorder) No Comments

It is normal for people to experience acute grief when they lose a loved one. As first explored in the book “On Death and Dying” by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, there are five accepted stages of grief. People move through these stages at different intervals, but most people find themselves in the end stages within several months of a loss. Normal or typical grief is experienced…

Anticipated Death vs Sudden or Traumatic Death No Comments

Death of any kind leaves a hole in the hearts of those left behind. The grieving process that takes place is similar no matter if the death was anticipated or sudden. There are, however, differences that can range from subtle to extreme. When someone has a terminal illness, friends and family have time to say the things they have always wanted to say…