Your Tribute

Since 2002, Your Tribute has provided a safe and secure environment for friends and family to connect and share memories. With Your Tribute you can create a free online obituary or personalized memorial website for a loved one in minutes.

A Message of Hope for the Bereaved from Ligia M. Houben No Comments

Grief is the natural response to a loss. As a Certified Grief Counselor, Life Transitions Coach, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Grief Counseling, Ligia has specialized in helping others deal with any loss or difficult life transition in a caring and empowering way. People generally try to ignore their…

Aging with Grace: The Benefit of Yoga for Seniors No Comments

Buddhism and Hinduism define Yoga as a “spiritual discipline,” but for today’s senior citizens, it means much more. When the topic of Yoga for seniors popped up, I instantly thought of my best friend’s grandmother, well into her seventies, who has been happily practicing this ancient technique for many decades…

Senior Super Food Guide (Infographic) No Comments

As we age, our bodies can readjust their nutritional needs. Digestion, systemic assimilation, cognitive function and more sometimes react differently to various foods. When the chapter of ‘senior’ emerges, a diet one has become accustomed to may no longer be acceptable…

Grief Recovery Guide No Comments

For most people, the grief process is a slow one. While you may move through one stage quickly, you may stay for what feels like ages in another. You will often feel like you have made a single step forward only to take several back. When you move in this manner, it can be difficult to know that you are making progress. If you pay close attention, there are clear signs…

Grief Process Guide No Comments

It stands to reason that people experience grief in different ways. No matter if the loss was sudden or expected, there is a feeling of abandonment and, sometimes, anger. Those who are left behind have to deal with emotions and feelings that may be unfamiliar. There are a multitude of types of losses. You may have experienced a loss through death, through relocation…

Grief Support Guide No Comments

When someone you know experiences a loss, your first instinct is to say “I’m sorry.” If you are like most people, these words don’t often seem adequate. You find yourself wanting to do something to help that person cope with their grief. Here are 20 tips that can better enable you to support and assist someone who is mourning. Ask the person if they want to talk…

What to Consider When Planning Your Own Funeral No Comments

Death is quite possibly one of the most difficult things any of us will ever have to face. Naturally, when the time comes for us, we want the process of funeral planning to be as easy as possible for our grieving loved ones. This is exactly why so many people are beginning to consider the benefits that come with planning their own funeral in advance. Deciding this is the right decision for you and your loved ones is one thing, but making sure all the bases are properly covered is another…

Executor Checklist No Comments

Determine Whether the Case Will Go to Probate When probate becomes needed depends frequently on the size of the estate and if there is no existing Will. If assets that are assigned to beneficiaries make up most of the estate, you may not need probate. Some states allow streamlined probate proceedings. No probate is needed if:  All real estate and assets are jointly owned.  All bank accounts are in “payable on death” format with named beneficiaries.  You can transfer funds retirement plans to named beneficiaries.  You can transfer real property to surviving spouse.  You can transfer assets held in trusts to named beneficiaries.   Decide Whether to Hire a Lawyer If the estate has many different types of real estate, significant tax liabilities, or the potential for disputes among inheritors, hiring a lawyer may be a good choice. In most cases, executors are able to handle their duties without a lawyer, especially if the executor is the main beneficiary and doesn’t expect any complications. You can hire a lawyer for two reasons: You’d like the attorney to guide you and answer questions, but still let you do all the work. In that case, it will be helpful for the lawyer to do any research you need and to review documents as you complete them. You’d like the lawyer to do absolutely everything required. The lawyer will be paid, either by charging a flat rate fee at an hourly rate, out of the estate proceeds.   You May Need Additional Help To get help, if you decide not to hire an estate attorney, you can: Ask probate court clerks basic questions about court procedures, but they cannot give you any legal advice. Consult court staff lawyers, if available, to look over all the probate documents. They may notice errors and allow you to fix them and resubmit. They may even tell you how to fix them. Refer to books written for laymen about settling estates. Find a good one that assumes you know nothing about estates, and guides you step-by-step through the entire process.   File the Will and Notify Beneficiaries If there is a Will, you must file a copy with the local court. File the Will — Ask about probate fees. You should ask the court to list you as the responsible person on the documents. Update the Beneficiaries — Provide updates at this time and at regular intervals and milestones. Beneficiaries need copies of the notice of the probate filing. Update the Excluded Relatives — If there are close relatives who are not named in the Will, but would have been beneficiaries if there had NOT been a valid will, it is a good idea to send them a notice, too. Be tactful and considerate. Obtain Copies of Death Certificates — Insurance companies and financial institutions ask for original copies of death certificates to transfer funds and close accounts. Locate Assets — Locate, identify, make an inventory, and provide security for the decedent’s assets. You are responsible for

8 Alternatives to a Traditional Burial No Comments

When most of think about funerals, we think of traditional caskets, church and graveside services and a sprinkling of earth into an open grave. This, of course, is the traditional western funeral that we have either been too or seen countless times on TV and in movies. Whilst there is absolutely nothing wrong with this type of funeral, there are alternatives that may be considered slightly less rigid and even have a lighter more convivial feel. An End-of-life plan is something that is purely down to an individual and should be respected according the their beliefs, wishes and choice…