Jason Ropchan

Jason Ropchan is the Founder and CEO of Your Tribute, an online resource for Funeral and Grief information and products. He has more than 15 years experience in the funeral industry developing and marketing funeral technology. He has worked with thousands of funeral homes worldwide to help them provide online memorials and video tributes to their families.

Families can use Your Tribute to create an online memorial to commemorate the life of a departed love one. Use the memorial to share his or her story, add photos and videos, leave condolences and memorials, and then invite friends and family to do the same. Your Tribute also provides users with hundreds of Funeral and Grief articles to help plan or attend a funeral, and recover from the grief of losing a loved one.

In 2004 Jason Ropchan founded Timeless Tributes, a video software program designed specifically for funeral homes. The software let funeral directors quickly and easily create professional Video Tributes for their families. The video was displayed during the funeral service and provided to the family as a keepsake. Timeless Tributes has been used by more than two thousand funeral homes to create more than half a million tribute videos.

How to Choose a Grief Support Group No Comments

When you lose someone or something that you love, grief is the most natural response. Sharing your experiences, thoughts and feelings with a group of people who have also experienced a loss can be cathartic. There are a variety of grief support groups available to you; choosing the right one will make all the difference. Grief support can play a vital role in the mental health…

How Grief Counseling and Therapy Can Help the Bereaved No Comments

When you lose a loved one, be it friend, family member or pet, you move through stages of grief. Many people choose to deal with the process on their own, not completely understanding the stages that they are going through. This can lead to feelings of sadness, depression and even anger at a level greater than which would normally be felt. For others, dealing with grief…

How to Offer Grief Support Based on Age Group No Comments

Everyone grieves differently. People move through the stages of grief at their own pace. This is especially true among the different age groups. While adults and the elderly may have coping mechanisms in place, toddlers, children and teens do not have the same life experiences. When you have lost a loved one, you may have immediate family members surrounding…

The Five (or Seven) Stages of Grief No Comments

Many people refer to the five stages of grief. If you have lost someone or know someone who has, you will come across many articles about moving through these stages. What you do not often see is the seven stages of grief model. This model closely follows the five stages model, with two additional platforms: pain/guilt and the upward turn. In essence, these emotions or stages…

How to Recognize Complicated Grief (Prolonged Grief Disorder) No Comments

It is normal for people to experience acute grief when they lose a loved one. As first explored in the book “On Death and Dying” by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, there are five accepted stages of grief. People move through these stages at different intervals, but most people find themselves in the end stages within several months of a loss. Normal or typical grief is experienced…

Anticipated Death vs Sudden or Traumatic Death No Comments

Death of any kind leaves a hole in the hearts of those left behind. The grieving process that takes place is similar no matter if the death was anticipated or sudden. There are, however, differences that can range from subtle to extreme. When someone has a terminal illness, friends and family have time to say the things they have always wanted to say…

After the Funeral No Comments

There’s an immediate flurry of activity after a loved one dies: informing friends and family, planning the funeral, sorting out immediate logistics for any dependent family, pets, or property, and so forth. That short term flurry of activity is just the beginning of the work, however: the recently departed person’s debts must be honored, government agencies notified, assets cared for and distributed to heirs … and while the funeral-related activities are measured in days and weeks, this second phase is usually measured in months and years. Who is Responsible? The responsibility for this second phase lies with the so-called estate “executor” (also known as the “personal representative” in many states). If the decedent passed away without legally naming an executor (typically in a will), each state has its own rules about who should, or is allowed to, serve as such an “executor”. If the court appoints this “executor”, often the role is referred to as the “administrator”. Whatever the exact title, it is the legal responsibility of the estate executor to “settle” the estate, which means to inventory the estate, resolve any debts, determine the heirs, file various legal forms, pay relevant taxes, and eventually distribute the net assets to those heirs in accordance with the terms of a valid will and/or local state ordinances. For the simplest estate, this usually takes at least 6 months, and it’s common for the process to take 18 months (and longer if the estate is complex, or there are disputes). Hiring an Attorney An executor will often hire a probate attorney to help with the process, much as a person hires an accountant to help with his or her taxes. In some states, there are rules restricting the fees such a probate attorney can charge, but in others, there are no such protections. Just as in paying taxes, however, hiring a professional to help you doesn’t absolve you of the work. Just as you need to collect and interpret your financial information for an accountant, you need to do something similar for a probate attorney … with the exception that it can be even more work, since you aren’t as familiar with the details, and you’re not just reporting a bunch of existing facts: you have to take actions to resolve debts, sell assets, etc. Online Help Some people decide that since they already have to do so much of the work themselves, it’s not worth it to hire a lawyer, and they spend some time researching the issues on the Internet, or via reference books specifically written to help with this process. Others take an easier path, using an online tool that guides them through the process and automatically keeps organized records that can be used for probate court and/or keeping the heirs informed. Much as people have largely given up filling out their taxes by hand (instead using something like TurboTax®), they are now starting to do the same for the executor process (instead using something like EstateExec™). Actually, a number

How to Choose the Right Funeral Home No Comments

There are numerous decisions and problems that need to be handled immediately after the passing of a loved one, and when one of those is choosing the funeral home to handle your needs — whether you’re looking for a visitation and burial service, a cremation, a graveside memorial, or even just a memorial banquet — it can seem overwhelming to even contemplate. By considering each type of…

How to Choose a Cemetery and Plot No Comments

In an ideal world, everyone will have the chance to pick out where they want their final resting place to be and what it will look like. Except it’s not an ideal world, and oftentimes it’s a loved one that’s responsible for making these decisions during an emotionally-charged time. If you’re currently in this predicament, you’ll need to think about location, cemetery types…

10 Steps for Planning a Funeral No Comments

If you have just lost a loved one, that last thing you may want to do is to start planning their funeral. However, careful planning is necessary if you want to give your loved one the kind of funeral and burial service they deserve. Understanding all the steps involved in planning a funeral can help to make this process easier, and it will ensure you do not forget anything…